@paranoid @puffinus_puffinus Lololol...

But seriously, communal cleaning issues are *everywhere* and they parallel the ecological crisis quite well in my opinion.

'The dishes' provide a safe way for people to experience Tragedy of the Commons and self-organize themselves out of it (or not πŸ˜‰ )

@douginamug @puffinus_puffinus
an interesting parallel to the ecological crisis, but i dont really buy into the "tragedy of the commons" (often portrayed as an inevitable outcome of human nature)[0][1]

in my experienece, the issue relates more to the general flakiness of the american left. all theory, no praxis

this behavior really shines with middle/high class people "performing" a working class life

[0]:blogs.scientificamerican.com/v
[1]:blogs.scientificamerican.com/o

@douginamug @puffinus_puffinus

In the US at least, people would rather hide their wealth and "perform working class" than live the idea of "From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs."

in this same meeting in fact someone was like, "i feel bad, all i have really been bringing to the table is money"

and everyone was like, "uh, money is actually really helpful rn trying to get this thing off of th ground"

@paranoid @puffinus_puffinus Ahh but! Degredation of shared resources is a thing when you don't make and enforce rules, and *that* is something 'the left' seems to find generally oppressive.

I highly recommend 'Governing the Commons' by Elinor Ostrom for an empirical investigation into successful and failed commons.

OK, could just be flakiness, it just seems to convenient an explanation for such a wide-spread problem.

@paranoid I tried using old IWW posters, but my roommates seem particularly averse to dishwashing.

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The Darkest Timeline

a private mastadon instance to experiment with